Error
  • JLIB_DATABASE_ERROR_FUNCTION_FAILED


  • Don't leave your electric water heater switched on permanently. Buy a timer and for as little as two hours use a day you will have sufficient hot water for your general needs.



  • Reduce the water heater thermostat setting to 120º F and choose 'low temperature' cycles when washing clothes.




  • The refrigerator is one of the biggest electricity consumers in the average home. Do not open and close it more than really necessary, and make sure the door seals are working properly. Otherwise you can expect your electricity consumption to be high.





  • Ensure the water level in your electric kettle always covers the element. By trying to save a few seconds, you only reduce the life of the element.





  • It makes no sense to turn your freezer off to save electricity. You will more probably use more electricity and may even spoil your frozen foods. Instead turn the freezer setting down.






  • Don't turn fluorescent lights on and off too frequently You will soon need a new bulb. Fluorescent lights are very efficient and do not consume much electricity.


  • At $0.95/kWh, you could save $3.63 a month for each 100-watt bulb that you replace by a 40-watt one (assuming it operates three hours a day for five days a week). But of course, the light won't be as bright, so this only makes sense for hallways, room lights etc. Even better, consider using compact fluorescent lights - these use only 20% of the energy of a normal incandescent light for the same brightness, and last several times longer.




  • Consider window fans, ceiling fans or whole-house fans (which use much less power) as an alternative to air conditioners. Shut off your air conditioner if you leave home for an extended period of time.




  • Close your blinds, shades or draperies during the hottest part of the day.


  • Heat or cool only the rooms you are using. Close off unused rooms.








  • Air conditioners work to remove humidity, so schedule moisture-making jobs such as dishwashing laundry and bathing for either early morning or at night when it’s cooler.


  • Shade the outdoor air conditioning unit if possible. A unit in the sun will use up to 5% more energy than one in the shade.


  • Clean or replace the air-conditioning filter monthly.




  • Turn off and unplug appliances when not in use: lights, TVs, computers, microwaves, CD players, etc. "Standby power" usage can account for up to 30 percent of your home electronics energy. Be sure to check the owner's manual to make sure this won't impact the memory or performance of the machine.



  • When buying new appliances, look at the yellow Energy Guide label and buy only energy-efficient appliances.


  • Activate "sleep" features on computers and office equipment that power down while on, but not in use for awhile. Turn them off altogether during long periods of non-use to cut utility costs and extend longevity.



  • Run your clothes washer and dishwasher only when they are full. You can save up to 1,000 gallons a month.


  • Some refrigerators, air conditioners and ice-makers are cooled with wasted flows of water. Consider upgrading with air-cooled appliances for significant water savings.


  • When buying new appliances, consider those that offer cycle and load size adjustments. They're more water and energy efficient.


  • Look for products bearing the EPA WaterSense Label for items that been certified to save 20% or more without sacrificing performance.


  • When doing laundry, match the water level to the size of the load.




  • When washing dishes by hand, don't let the water run while rinsing. Fill one sink with wash water and the other with rinse water.


  • Designate one glass for your drinking water each day or refill a water bottle. This will cut down on the number of glasses to wash.


  • When washing dishes by hand, fill the sink basin or a large container and rinse when all of the dishes have been soaped and scrubbed.



  • Install covers on pools and spas and check for leaks around your pumps.


  • Use a grease pencil to mark the water level of your pool at the skimmer. Check the mark 24 hours later to see if you have a leak.


  • Make sure your swimming pools, fountains, and ponds are equipped with recirculating pumps.




  • Turn off the water while brushing your teeth and save 25 gallons a month.


  • When you are washing your hands, don't let the water run while you lather.


  • Teach your children to turn off faucets tightly after each use.




  • Shorten your shower by a minute or two and you'll save up to 150 gallons per month.


  • When running a bath, plug the tub before turning the water on, then adjust the temperature as the tub fills up.


  • To save water and time, consider washing your face or brushing your teeth while in the shower.


  • If your shower fills a one-gallon bucket in less than 20 seconds, replace the shower head with a water-efficient model.


  • When running a bath, plug the tub before turning the water on, then adjust the temperature as the tub fills up.


  • Turn off the water while you shave and save up to 300 gallons a month.


  • To save water and time, consider washing your face or brushing your teeth while in the shower.




  • When you save water, you save money on your utility bills too. Saving water is easy for everyone to do.


  • If your toilet was installed before 1992, reduce the amount of water used for each flush by inserting a displacement device in the tank.


  • If your toilet flapper doesn't close after flushing, replace it.





  • Collect water from your roof to water your garden.


  • Install a rain sensor on your irrigation controller so your system won't run when it's raining.


  • Direct water from rain gutters and HVAC systems toward water-loving plants in the landscape for automatic water savings.


  • Support projects that use reclaimed wastewater for irrigation and industrial uses.


  • Monitor your water bill for unusually high use. Your bill and water meter are tools that can help you discover leaks.



  • Remember to check your sprinkler system valves periodically for leaks and keep the sprinkler heads in good shape.


  • Report broken pipes, open hydrants and errant sprinklers to the property owner or your water provider.


MUL Side Note